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You Got the Feels?! Final Testing

Technical solution description

Our technical solution entails using LEGO color sensors to read the colored emotion cards, sending the information to the Raspberry Pi to calculate the score for each player, and moving the servo motor according to the scores. Various construction materials, including MyRio kit and acrylic board, were used to construct the rails on which the car runs, box in which all rails are enclosed, and the LED lights that indicate the submission of the answers.

Pictures:

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Left: Finalized Product

Top-right: Cars on the rails

Bottom-right: Color sensor station

Product in action (Slides 10 & 12)

Code

Final Testing Results Summary

Technical: Each sensors worked well to read the card in each round. Unlike the initial testing, we had no internet connectivity issue nor hardware issue. Improvement points that we notices were those of user interface and the rail distance. For user interface, we should be able to operate the monitor from the microprocessor (Rasp Pi) instead of plugging in separately into the laptop. Furthermore, the game can all be automated if on/off switch is attached onto the game board.For the rail distance, longer rail will help to show the difference in the distance that each score exhibits in more obvious way.

Curriculum: During our final testing session, we tested the prototype with two groups, each comprised of three Kindergartners. We implemented several changes that were effective with both groups: redesign of emotion cards so that children can better associate emotions with colors, more concise orientation to the emotion cards before playing the game, and better spatial orientation so that all children have visual access to the game and the display monitor. With both groups, we were able to engage in rich discussions with children about their differing answers. During the second game, however, one child became frustrated that he wasn't "winning" the game, which required us to explain the emotion cards more clearly and help him understand that even though he wasn't in the lead, he was still answering correctly.